Thoughts on Technical Project Management in the Freelance Economy and the Future of Work

All Posts by Chris Remus
Chris is a freelance technical project manager living in Brooklyn, NY. I manage projects remotely for clients around the world. I write about technical project management in the freelance economy and the future of work.

Would You Like Your Own buytokenswith.eth Subdomain?

Published June 1, 2017 in Experimental - 0 Comments

The Ethereum Name Service (ENS) replaces complicated Ethereum addresses with easy to use Ethereum names. I’m feeling excited for ENS’ potential to make Ethereum easier for more people to use.

I won the Ethereum Name Service (ENS) auction for buytokenswith.eth. I’m thinking about offering custom subdomains on it.

Example Use Cases​

Here are some use cases I’m considering -

[Names in brackets are placeholders.]

[yourname].buytokenswith.eth

This example could make it easier for an individual to buy and sell tokens.

[companyname].buytokenswith.eth

This example could make it easier for a company to buy and sell tokens.

[tokenauction].buytokenswith.eth

This example could make it easier for a token issuer to sell tokens. (Although they don’t seem to need help with this at the moment!)

[tokenamount.tokenname].buytokenswith.eth

This example could make it easier for an individual or company to buy or sell a specific amount of a specific token.

Sound Interesting?

I’m not sure how this would work yet. I’d like to gauge interest in the idea, before investing more time and resources figuring out the details.

Please submit your email address below if you’re interested in the idea. I'll only email you with updates about buytokenswith.eth subdomains.

You can also contact me here with feedback or questions about the idea.

Tags: blockchain , ens , ethereum

[Updated — I Joined the ENS Team] How a Project Manager Can Help the Ethereum Name Service Launch Succeed This Time

Published March 23, 2017 in Technical Project Management - 1 Comment
Timeline from Nick Johnson’s Postmortem

How a Project Manager Can Help the ENS Launch Succeed This Time

The first attempt to Launch the Ethereum Name Service (ENS) failed. Here’s how a project manager can make the next try successful.

The Ethernet Name Service (ENS) launched for a short time on March 14, 2017. The ENS community discovered two major security flaws shortly after launch. The team and community behind ENS decided to roll back the launch and try again.

Updated — I joined Nick Johnson and Alex Van de Sande on the ENS team shortly after writing this post. You can find updates on the relaunch here.

I give the team a lot of credit for — 

  • Trying to launch the service in the first place
  • Getting the project to launch
  • Having the awareness to acknowledge problems and address them
  • Making the hard decision to pull back and try again
  • Their transparency in acknowledging what didn’t work and why
  • Their commitment to getting it right, by trying again

You can read about how things unfolded and security flaw details in -

Like Nick’s approach, I hope this post identifies places where a blockchain project manager can help projects like this succeed. It’s not intended to criticize, point fingers or place blame, AT ALL!

It’s also my offer to donate some of my time to provide project management oversight for the project!

(Nick Johnson, if you read this, let me know if you’d like to take me up on the offer.)

How a Blockchain Project Manager Help the ENS Launch Succeed this Time

I’ve written a post about the value project managers can contribute to blockchain projects. This post is a case study to that earlier thesis about the need for blockchain project managers to manage blockchain projects.

This rest of this post -

1 — Lists the causes and issues mentioned by Johnson and Maurelian

Nick Johnson and Maurelian identified many of the same causes and issues in their post-mortems. Each also identified other issues. This post focuses on the issues mentioned by both of them, for the sake of brevity.

2 — Describes how a blockchain project manager could have helped prevent each cause and issue.

Spoiler Alert — The Takeaway

Technical people develop technical solutions to difficult problems. That’s what they do. That’s what they want to do.

What’s missing is someone keeping an eye on the big picture to -

  • Identify issues before they become problems
  • Coordinate resources, making sure there are enough and guiding them to where they can be most effective
  • Gracefully slow down the project, only long enough to help everyone pick up their heads, adjust the end goal as needed and stay synchronized toward the agreed-to end goal
  • Do the work developers don’t want to do, e.g. document the project, coordinate audits, confirm thoroughness of plans, develop contingency plans etc

A blockchain project manager keeps an eye on the big picture. Keep reading for more detail.

(You can also contact me to discuss how I can make your blockchain project a success.)

Causes and Issues

Issue 1 — Incomplete Test Coverage

Johnson — Although the registrar had a suite of unit tests, this testing was not comprehensive. The unit tests were written after the contract by a different author. No concerted effort was made to ensure that all code paths or use cases were thoroughly covered.

Maurelian — Both of the issues uncovered could have been caught with tests to verify proper behaviour of the registrar. The behaviours which the issues enabled were not edge cases, but rather specifically prohibited…only 13…tests were on the Registrar contract, which has at least as many methods and many more requirements than that.

A blockchain project manager could(’ve) help(ed) by making sure the unit tests covered all code paths or use-cases by -

  • Developing a checklist of code paths and use-cases
  • Coordinating resources to execute the unit tests
  • Consolidating the results
  • Coordinate issue resolution

Issue 2 — No Formal and Independent Audit

Johnson — No independent, comprehensive audit was done.

Maurelian — There was no formal audit. There is unfortunately no single document summarizing what review was done, and what was found.

A blockchain project manager could(’ve) help(ed) by — 

  • Running the process to select an independent third party to conduct a formal audit
  • Acting as the liaison between the development and audit teams
  • Developing the review summary document

Issue 3 — Insufficient Code Review

Johnson -The changes to the contract that introduced the bugs were subject to review in a Pull Request, but the review did not catch the bugs. In future, more care is needed when reviewing changes to critical code to ensure reversions aren’t accidentally introduced.

Maurelian — (Referred to this issue as thrashing.) It’s nearly impossible to audit an evolving code base…Many changes were made between the Ropsten launch, and the live net launch…I actually looked at the commit that introduced these issues, but it’s a large contract…the effort required to…understand the full implications of the change felt onerous.

A blockchain project manager could(’ve) help(ed) by maintaining documentation that would make it -

  • Faster and easier to identify changes between commits.

Which would -

  • Make change implications feel less onerous to developers, who are already time-limited, allowing them to be more comfortable conducting code reviews.

A blockchain project manager could(’ve) also help(ed) coordinate more resources to conduct code reviews.

Issue 4 — No Official Bug Bounty

Johnson — A good bug bounty has…real value up for grabs…this is hard to do on a test net, where the tokens have no value, and stuff is expected not to work…WeiFund’s live net bug bounty, which held over 200,000 USD worth of real value in deployed contract, is a good counter-example. Blockchains present an interesting opportunity for a “natural bug bounty”, we as contract developers should be taking advantage of this.

Maurelian — No clear indication was provided to the community as to whether ENS was covered by the Ethereum Foundation’s bug bounty process. Had it been announced that ENS was covered, more attention would likely have been directed towards the code at an earlier stage in the process, resulting in the bugs being found at a stage where they could be easily remedied without affecting the launch.

A blockchain project manager could’ve helped by coordinating — 

  • Development of a Wei-Fund-like bug-bounty.
  • Alternative motivational programs, to encourage others to take part in the bug-bounty process.
  • Communicating a bug-bounty marketing plan.

Issue 5 — Incident response planning

(This one was only mentioned by Maurelian. I thought it was worth a mention, since a blockchain project manager could play a very valuable role here.)

Maurelian — …but bugs were always a possibility, so the need to delay should always be considered in advance. A common approach is to have a play book, basically, “if X happens, we will do Y”. I think that the reaction so far has been suitably transparent and proactive, but would have been better organized if the decisions had been made beforehand.

A blockchain project manager could(’ve) help(ed) by — 

  • Developing the play book.
  • Managing responses during implementation, according to the agreed-to playbook guidelines.

Here’s the Takeaway — Again!

I figured a repeat of the take away’s in order, if you read this entire post. And thanks for reading if you did!

Technical people develop technical solutions to difficult problems. That’s what they do. That’s what they want to do.

What’s missing is someone keeping an eye on the big picture to -

  • Identify issues before they become problems
  • Coordinate resources, making sure there are enough and guiding them to where they can be most effective
  • Gracefully slow down the project, only long enough to help everyone pick up their heads, adjust the end goal as needed and stay synchronized toward the agreed-to end goal
  • Do the work developers don’t want to do, e.g. document the project, coordinate audits, confirm thoroughness of plans, develop contingency plans etc

A blockchain project manager keeps an eye on the big picture.

P.S. — Working on a blockchain project? Contact me to discuss how I can help make your blockchain project a success.

Here’s Why Your Project Needs a Blockchain Project Manager

Published March 13, 2017 in Technical Project Management - 1 Comment
blockchain project manager

You're a brilliant blockchain developer. You're excited about the potential blockchain offers your clients. Your clients are excited about the potential blockchain offers their businesses. They've hired you to help them realize that potential.  Here's why you need a blockchain project manager to make that happen.

You're both excited. You sign the contract. You and your team puts your collective head down. You do what you do well. You start coding. That's what the client's paid you to do, right?

You work through nights to hit deadlines. You tell your client's everything's looking good.You start to feel a disconnect between you and your client. You start to get frustrated. They start to get frustrated.

The initial excitement you both shared turns into frustration. You hesitate to contact them, since the conversations are getting tense. Instead, you put your head down and code more. That's going to fix the problem, you think.

What you're building digresses from what the the client wants. The frustrations builds. The tension does too.Timelines get stretched. Budgets get stressed. You keep working and your profit margin keeps shrinking. The client's budget keeps growing. They start wondering if they hired the right person. They start wondering if this whole blockchain thing is only smoke and mirrors.

Why is this happening?

You Don't Have a Blockchain Project Manager​

You don't have anyone managing the project or client expectations. You're doing what you're good at. You're coding away.

The trouble is, it's hard to see the big picture at the same time. It's not your fault. It's not where you're hired to focus. Your focus is solving difficult problems with creative technology solutions. That's what you do well. That's why clients hire you.

This is a major reason what you build diverges from what the client needs. Another one is that clients, especially with an emerging technology like blockchain, need you to tell them what they need. Some clients need you to tell them a lot, others less. But they all need at least a little guidance.

This means aligning expectations is a critical function. It needs to happen at the beginning of a project, when everything's looking rosy.

Expectations needs to stay aligned during the project. Sometimes this means the conversations become a little uncomfortable. Having the uncomfortable conversations throughout makes the really uncomfortable conversations less likely to be necessary.

The comfortable thing to do is write more code. The uncomfortable thing is to have the uncomfortable conversation. Doing the comfortable thing in this case causes expectations to diverge even more.

This is why your blockchain project needs a project manager. This person will manage the alignment process. They'll keep your work aligned with client expectations. This will let you focus on what you do well, while ensuring the client's expectations get met.

A Blockchain Project Manager​ Makes Everyone Happy

Having a dedicated project manager in this role reduces frustration. This person will manage frustration skillfully when it does arise, since it will still arise here and there. A blockchain project manager will help make your project successful.

Everyone will be happier as a result. The client will realize the value of blockchain. You'll enjoy the satisfaction that delivering a creative solution for a happy client provides.

This is why your blockchain project needs a blockchain project manger.

Convinced?

Are you convinced a blockchain project manager can make your project successful? I'd be happy to manage your blockchain project. I'd also be glad to get your existing blockchain project back on track, if it's already gone awry.

Either way, contact me and let's talk!​

Not Convinced Yet?

Still want to go it alone, without a blockchain project manager?

Please at least read how I manage critical client expectations and try and do the same for your project. If you're able to do this, while still doing what you do best, you'll save yourself trouble down the road.

(Photo credit Bogden Dada via Unsplash.)

Here’s What the Best Project Managers Do and Don’t Do

Published January 24, 2017 in Technical Project Management - 0 Comments
The Best Project Managers Keep a Project Running Smoothly

The best project managers keep a project running smoothly. We also stay out of the way. That means doing some things and not doing others. Here are the do's and don'ts of the best project managers.

Do set the path to a successful outcome. Do keep the path clear and stay out of the way. Don't block the path.

Do set the path to a successful outcome by developing, updating and communicating the path. Do keep the path clear by removing roadblocks. Do give your team what they need to make progress down the path, toward the successful outcome.

Do ask questions when they benefit the project. Do ask the hard questions when necessary.

Don't block the path. Don't get in the way. Don't impede progress. Don't establish process related roadblocks on the path. Don't stop people smarter than you from doing what they need to do. Don't be afraid to admit when you don't know something.

Don't ask unnecessary questions for your own personal benefit. Don't shy away from asking the hard questions when necessary.

Do set your team up for success. Do give credit to team members where and when credit is due. Don't take undue credit when the team succeeds.

Do take responsibility when things don't go well. Don't blame the team when a project goes off-track.

Do celebrate small wins along the way. Do use the small wins to build momentum toward the bigger goal. Do try and have some fun as you proceed down the path toward a successful outcome 🙂

A project manager who follows these do's and don'ts will keep a project running smoothly. A project manager who doesn't follow them will only cause problems and get in the way.

Contact me to work with a project manager who follows these do's and don'ts. I'll keep your project running smoothly.​

3 Reasons Asana is the Right Choice to Manage IT Projects

Published September 9, 2016 in Technical Project Management - 0 Comments

​Asana Is The Right Choice to Keep Your IT Tasks Organized

Asana is my choice for managing IT projects. I’ve managed big IT projects for large government agencies and financial institutions. I wish Asana had been available to use on those projects. I was stuck using MS Project. That’s a nightmare I don’t wish to experience again 🙂

I’ve used Asana to manage projects since then. I also use it to manage my daily priorities. Asana has helped me complete thousands of daily tasks.

Here are the 3 reasons I’d choose Asana to manage IT projects.

1 - Flexibility

Asana is a flexible tool. It’s organized into workspaces, projects, tasks and subtasks.

This four tier structure can support projects of any size. Companies organize projects in different ways. Individuals use different approaches to get work done. Asana’s flexibility adapts to the various organizational approaches used to complete tasks and projects.

Drawback/Shortcoming -

Asana can become complicated in the hands of an inexperienced project manager. The flexible structure will do what you want it to do. This is an asset for an experienced project manager. An experienced project manager knows how to structure efficient project workflows. We know how to balance simplicity with complexity.

This same asset can become a liability for an inexperienced project manager. It will do what the project manger tells it to do. It won't dictate how a project is set up.Asana will allow an experienced project manager to set up an effective project structure. Asana will also allow an inexperienced project manager to set up an ineffective project structure.

2 - Collaboration

Asana supports collaboration at each level of its structure. A project owner can add collaborators to workspaces, projects, tasks and subtasks. The project owner can set permissions at each level of the structure as well.

Asana organizes communication at each level of its structure as well. This makes it easy to view the communication you need to see at any one time, i.e. the history of a task.

This organization prevents you from getting distracted by communication unrelated to the workspace, project, task or subtask at hand. The approach also helps keep your email Inbox clean.

(Tip: Make sure to set up your notifications to limit the number of emails you receive.)

Drawback/Shortcoming -The free version doesn't provide a full range of flexible permission options. You have to upgrade to a paid version for access to the most flexible permission options. The concept of adding a collaborator as a "Guest" can be a bit confusing too.

3 - User Experience

Asana is list-based. The lists are organized in a user-friendly way. I describe the user experience as list-based. Asana leads with a list-based structure and adds appropriate UX enhancements throughout the tool.

It’s a systematic and logical approach to UX. I’d say it leads with the left side of the brain and allows the right side of the brain to soften the edges. I believe this UX approach synchronizes well with how IT people and organizations think.

This is a key point. A task management tool is only helpful if it's adopted and used. Choosing a tool that fits well with a team’s way of thinking goes along way in increasing adoption and use. This helps your project succeed. Isn’t that the whole point of using a task management tool in the first place?

Drawback/Shortcoming -

I wouldn't say Asana's UX is the most "beautiful" project management tool out there. It's practical and pretty enough though.

The list-based approach may not be the right tool for a team heavy on creative people. People more comfortable with a visual interface might prefer a different tool.

Selection of the right tool to get IT tasks done depends on many factors. Flexibility, collaboration and user experience are the three reasons I use Asana to manage IT tasks. Give it a try if these reasons are important to you as well.

P.S. - Want to give Asana a try? Drop me a line if you need help structuring your Asana workflow. I'll help you maximize Asana's effectiveness, while avoiding the tool's potential shortcomings.

Photo by Jesse Oricco via Unsplash

Here’s How to Become a Project Manager in the NYC Tech Ecosystem

I curate a weekly list of project manager job openings at top tech and startup companies in New York. Use it to make finding your next project management job at a top New York tech or startup company easier and faster. Subscribe for free here.

I update the list each week. It includes jobs from the best New York tech and startup job sources like -

Subscribe now to receive the list each week for free.

My hope is it will make finding your next project manager job at a company you enjoy faster and easier!

Why do I do this?

I believe the future of work is about collaboration, not ruthless competition. I curate this list to help the project management community in New York thrive!

P.S. - Would you like me to add a new source or your company’s posting to the list? Please send it to me for consideration by contacting me here.

Photo credit, recent NYC Startup Map from Digital NYC

Here Are My Dead Simple Project Management Principles

Published March 2, 2016 in Technical Project Management - 0 Comments

Trying Hard to Keep It Simple

Project management should be simple. There's no reason for project management to become a complex monster that feeds on precious project resources. Project management should maximize the effectiveness of resources. It shouldn't consume them.

Here are some dead simple project management principles I try and follow. I review them before initiating a project. I also come back to them once a project leaps forward from the starting gate.

I find them to be a grounding and refocusing tool. They help prevent managing a project from becoming bigger than the project itself.

Dead Simple Project Management Principles

Do set the path to a successful outcome. Do keep the path clear and stay out of the way. Don't block the path.

Do set the path to a successful outcome by developing, updating and communicating the path. Do keep the path clear by removing roadblocks. Do give your team what they need to make progress down the path, toward the successful outcome.

Do ask questions when they benefit the project. Do ask the hard questions when necessary.

Don't block the path. Don't get in the way. Don't impede progress. Don't establish process related roadblocks on the path.

Don't stop people smarter than you from doing what they need to do. Don't be afraid to admit when you don't know something.

Don't ask unnecessary questions for your own personal benefit. Don't shy away from asking the hard questions when necessary.

Do set your team up for success. Do give credit to team members where and when credit is due. Don't take undue credit when the team succeeds.

Do take responsibility when things don't go well. Don't blame the team when a project goes off-track.

Do celebrate small wins along the way. Do use the small wins to build momentum toward the bigger goal.

Do try and have some fun as you proceed down the path toward a successful outcome 🙂

This post is based on an answer I wrote on Quora to the question "What are the top do's and don'ts that a new project manager should remember?"

Remote Technical Project Manager Jobs for You

Published February 17, 2016 in Technical Project Management - 0 Comments
remote technical project manager jobs

Finding remote technical project manager jobs can be like finding a needle in a haystack. My lists of remote technical project manager jobs and projects make it easier for you.

Signup for free access to the lists using the form at the bottom of this post.

Always Current Lists of Remote Technical Project Manager Jobs

You'll receive free access to these two always current lists -

1 - Selected Sources - Remote

This is a listing of high-end remote technical project manager jobs and projects. Only Twitter accounts I feel post high quality and relevant jobs and projects post to this list.

2 - General Searches - Remote

This is a listing of remote technical project manager jobs and projects. Any Twitter account can post to this list.

Always Up-To-Date

Both lists update about every 15 minutes. This means they're always up-to-date.

Why am I doing this?

I'm a freelance, remote technical project manager. I believe that the way we work is changing to an on-demand, virtual model for knowledge workers.

Lists like this will become a valuable source of information that fuels the new way we work.

Benedict Evans, venture capitalist at Andreessen-Horowitz, even believes lists are the new search.

I'm also a strong believer in collaboration. As a result, I'm happy to share these lists with others who may be looking for remote technical manager jobs and projects. I'm sharing the lists to pay it forward to the technical project management community.

Enter your information below to access the lists!

You'll also be added  my newsletter. The purpose of the newsletter is to help you become a -

  • Successful and sought-after a technical project manager in the freelance economy
  • Thriving leader in the future of work, as it continues to manifest around us

I hope the newsletter becomes as valuable to you as the lists. Feel free to unsubscribe at any time.

You'll still have access to the lists if you unsubscribe. Although I hope you won't 🙂

Photo credit Jenelle Ball via Unsplash